Malteser International Expands Aid to Prevent Conflicts
Africa Social

Malteser International Expands Aid to Prevent Conflicts

The Malteser International is extending  its emergency aid from Kenya to Ethiopia, providing people with drinking water and cash.

Roland Hansen, Head of the Africa Department at Malteser International said the organization will provide drinking water, food packages and supplementary food for pregnant women and young children.

For more than two years, the Horn of Africa has experienced a persistent decline in rainfall.

According to the United Nations, more than 20 million people are in urgent need of aid as a result of a severe drought. 7.46 million children are acutely malnourished. Livestock has starved to death, fields are destroyed, wells have dried up.

“For around two years, we have been providing drinking water, food and cash to people in northern Kenya who are suffering the consequences of a devastating drought. We also distribute livestock feed,”  said Hansen.

He added that in recent months, more people from Ethiopia have been crossing the border to Kenya hoping to find enough feed for their livestock.

“To spare them the rigors of fleeing and to prevent conflicts over the remaining resources, we are now extending our aid to Ethiopia. Many families have already lost a large part of their livestock. After more than two years of drought, people are at their wits’ end and the need is great. Droughts are becoming more frequent as a result of climate change. Those who contributed least to climate change are suffering the most: they are starving and there is no end in sight to this catastrophe,” said Hansen.

With the support of the German Federal Foreign Office, Malteser International will expand its aid to southern Ethiopia.

“In the coming months, we will provide drinking water, food packages and supplementary food for pregnant women and young children. Around 4,000 schoolchildren at ten schools in Ethiopia will receive one hot meal per day. In addition, we will distribute livestock feed to farmers,” Hansen said.

“The people in East Africa are currently struggling with many crises at the same time. Without help, thousands could die,” says Hansen.